Lux Radio Theater Presents – Moontide – 1945

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Honorary Radio Bogie Fix:

Radio Fixes

The Lowdown

An alcoholic boatman (Bogart) rescues a suicidal woman (Virginia Bruce) and they try to use their relationship to escape the boatman’s checkered past.

What I Thought

This one’s a real hidden gem that I’d never heard of until it popped up as a recommendation on my Spotify account.

While most radio adaptions of famous films get the short shrift of 30 minutes or less, Lux gives this one plenty of room to breath with it’s 55 minute running time. Hosted by Mark Hellinger, the producer of the original 1942 film starring Jean Gabin and Ida Lupino, Hellinger was responsible for producing quite a few of Bogart’s film’s over his career.

Perhaps the most surprising moments come during the show’s intro when Hellinger describes his first encounters with a young stage comedian name Humphrey Bogart. Towards the end of the show, we get Bogart and Hellinger together again talking about Bogart’s comedic days on stage, and it’s interesting to consider that Bogart may have lived a good chunk of his life working towards roles that were the antithesis of his gun toting tough guys or ex-pat drinkers.

The broadcast also benefits from an elevation in cast as we get Humphrey Bogart over the film’s original Jean Rabin. I’m not knocking Rabin, but Bogart rarely gave anything less than his best to his radio performances, and his work here is as good as any other radio he’s done.

Bogart plays Bobo, a bait fisherman who occasionally gets blackout drunk and forgets whether or not he might have murdered someone. He plays the part with plenty of wary pause and reluctance – much like a man at the end of his his rope might behave, and the tension raised by the did he do it or not dramatics within his relationship to Virginia Bruce make the love story crackle.

Would I rather have heard Ida Lupino recreate her role? Of course. I have a big crush on Ms. Lupino, and it would have been nice to hear her voice. But then again, I can always go back to the original film, right?

There is a portrayal of an Asian bait fisherman that is insensitive by today’s standards, but other than that, this one’s worth checking out if you can find it!

Barton MacLane

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Birth Name: Ernest Barton MacLane

Date of Birth: December 25, 1902

Date of Death: January 1, 1969

Number of Films Barton MacLane Made with Humphrey Bogart: 6

Barton MacLane is a memorable guy. Large, gruff, and generally projecting a face that makes you assume that his stomach has been sour for several hours, MacLane was a staple tough guy in Hollywood films and television for five decades.

While many recognize MacLane from his role as Lieutenant MacBride in the Torchy film series, or his extended run as General Peterson on I Dream of Jeannie, I would guess that most casual Classic Film fans know him from his work alongside of Bogart in The Maltese Falcon, High Sierra, and The Treasure of the Sierra Madre.

MacLane has been an actor that I’ve long planned on placing into The Usual Suspects. While most of his characters in Bogart films – either crooks or cops – tend to have the same gruff demeanor and bleak outlook on life, MacLane is one of those actors that made a long and successful career out of playing exactly the man you’d expect him to be based on his appearance.

That’s not to say that MacLane didn’t have a few surprises up his sleeve. Yes, he played college football, but did you also know that he could play the violin? Sure he played a cowboy for film and television and lived up to that Western persona as he worked his own cattle ranch in his down time, but did you know that he also attended the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, wrote and performed on Broadway, and was married to the talented and beautiful actress Charlotte Wynters?

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Regardless of how you might know Barton MacLane, the one thing I know for sure is that he was never miscast in a Bogie film. Gangster or Detective. Prison Guard or Conman. MacLane elevated every film he starred in with his commanding presence and his well-honed acting skills. (Plus, he and Bogart were both Christmas babies!) So today we welcome Barton MacLane into The Usual Suspects!

The Filmography

Bullets or Ballots – 1936

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MacLane plays racketeer Al Kruger, the man who tries to lure Edward G. Robinson into a life of crime after a scandalous dismissal from the police force. Despite the fact that the movie might not be the best, this is perhaps MacLane’s most likable role in a Bogart film. Playing “the thinking man’s gangster,” MacLane is able to elicit sympathy from both the film’s hero (Robinson) and the tough-guy gangster (Bogart) who tries so desperately to convince him that Robinson is a no good double dealer. If he’d only listened to Bogart! Why, Al, why? Definitely my favorite MacLane role on this list.

You can read my original post on the film here.

San Quentin – 1937

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MacLane plays prison guard Lieutenant Druggin who just wants to be the captain of the yard if not for Pat O’Brien’s meddling ways. MacLane’s Druggin wants hard-nosed justice. Prisoners should be put in their places, forcefully, the moment that they step out of line. O’Brien’s dashing prison captain believes in a much more subtle approach – respecting the prisoners as men in their own rights who deserve the benefit of the doubt. It’s a role that calls for the gruffest and sourest that MacLane has to offer, and he’s perfectly cast in the film.

You can read my original post on the film here.

High Sierra – 1941

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MacLane plays Jake, the right hand man to Donald MacBride who plays the ailing ringleader of Bogart’s robbery crew. The part is a bit smaller than the previous two in his Bogie filmography, but MacLane does well as he spends his time giving Bogart the suspicious eye while trying to muscle in on MacBride’s soon-to-be open position.

You can read my original post on the film here.

The Maltese Falcon – 1941

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MacLane plays Lieutenant of Detectives Dundy in a semi-friendly role to Bogart’s private detective, Sam Spade. Most of the film’s sparse comic relief comes from MacLane’s one-step-behind pursuit of Bogart, and both men seem to be enjoying their time on screen together as they appear to be on the verge of smiling at each other’s faux tough guy antics. Probably MacLane’s most well know Classic Film, his perfectly cast supporting role only adds to the iconic status of this movie.

You can read my original post on the film here.

All Through the Night – 1942

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MacLane plays Marty Callahan, one of Bogart’s rival gangsters that ends up coming to help when it’s time to punch some Nazis. MacLane’s best moments in this small role come when he has to deal with Bogart’s frazzled mother as she storms his nightclub looking for the murderer of a local baker. Again, not a huge role, but MacLane’s involvement is just another piece of this great ensemble cast that makes the film great.

You can read my original post on the film here.

The Treasure of the Sierra Madre –1948

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MacLane plays McCormick, a less-than-reputable foreman who cheats Bogart and Tim Holt out of some very hard earned wages. It’s a chance for MacLane to be a bit more blowhard, and a bit less tough than how we usually see him in the rest of his Bogart filmography, and it all leads to a great great bar fight between MacLane, Bogart, and Holt that’s brutal, bloody, and incredibly satisfying when it comes to enacting revenge on the man who stole their paychecks!

You can read my original post on the film here.

*The Usual Suspects is an ongoing section of the blog where I highlight some of Bogart’s more regular collaborators. You can read the rest of the write ups here.*

Theater of Romance: One Way Passage – 1945

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Honorary Bogie Radio Fix:

Radio Fixes 3

The Lowdown

Bogart (Warner’s Dynamic Star!) and Joan Bennett (who would go on to star with Bogart in We’re No Angels) are two ships passing in the night (pun intended) in this doom-fated romance between a man headed to death row and a woman with a fatal heart defect.

What I Thought

Full disclosure, I’ve never seen the William Powell and Kay Francis film that this one is based on, although it sounds like it might be worth checking out after this.

Yes – you know exactly where the plot is going. Yes – it’s hard to feel too much sympathy for Bogart every time his murder conviction is mentioned. Yes – you do wonder why the cop guarding Bogart continues to trust him even after Bogart drugs him while trying to escape.

If you can believe me though, all of that is trivial compared to the thoroughly enjoyable chemistry between Bogart and Bennett as they fall in love and spend their last days together. Neither will tell the other one their fateful secret. (And why would Bennett ever suspect Bogart’s murderous past? I mean, it’s not like every death row inmate gets to head to his execution on a cruise, right?)

At twenty-four minutes, this one’s definitely worth a listen for any Bogart or Old Time Radio fan. Plus, we get great tips on hygiene from Colgate Tooth Powder and Halo Shampoo! Did you know that bad breath can lead to unexplainable sadness? And why isn’t Halo Shampoo still a thing? Best. Shampoo. Name. Ever.

Why struck me as most interesting was that Bogart didn’t seem to be promoting a film for this one. Broadcast in December of 1945, this show came six months after Conflict was released, and six months before Bogart made his cameo in Two Guys from Milwaukee.

Maybe he liked the original film!

 

The Petrified Forest – Ashley’s Take!

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*Bogie Film Blog: A great post by Ashley today where she perfectly sums up the caged animal-like persona of Duke Mantee! This is just a taste, so make sure you click on over to Ashley’s blog to finish it, then check out her Twitter and Letterboxd profiles! The gal LOVES film, and she’s a great follow!*

From Ashley:

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“Humphrey Bogart plays a tired, haggard criminal who seems to long for a break from his criminal ways. He doesn’t seem to want to be anything to anyone, which is why he takes the quiet background approach to the diner takeover. Plotting their next move and being oddly praised by their most senior hostage, Duke is consistently pulled in one direction or another, and it seems as he sits back and takes in his situation that he is in dire need of a break.”

Head on over and check out the rest here!

*Ashley’s Take is part of the Take 2 series here on The Bogie Film Blog where we have guest writers give us there take on a classic Bogie film! You can read the rest of the entries here.*

The Maltese Falcon

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Birth Name: The Maltese Falcon

Date of Birth:  October 18, 1941

Date of Death: STILL OUT THERE SOMEWHERE…LEADING MEN AND WOMEN DOWN A DANGEROUS ROAD OF GREED AND DESIRE…

Number of Films that The Maltese Falcon Made with Humphrey Bogart: 3

The Lowdown

I couldn’t be fonder of you if you were my own son. But, well, if you lose a son, it’s possible to get another. There’s only one Maltese Falcon.” – Kasper Gutman, The Maltese Falcon

To be fair, there are more than one of those little beauties out there. Sydney Greenstreet marred one with his pen knife for the film. Several extras were made of varying weights for backups. Bogart supposedly even dropped one and dented the tail. Several years ago, one came back into the spotlight when Leonardo DiCaprio purchased it at auction for a little over $300,000. (Nearly the original budget of the film.)

Oh, I knew that the Falcon made a quick cameo in 1945’s Conflict as a little nod to the reunion of Bogart and Greenstreet, but imagine my surprise and delight when I stumbled across its presence in yet another film! A film that I’d seen at least a dozen times! A film that is in my Top 5 Bogie favorites! How could I have been so blind?

Two appearances would have been enough to warrant an entry into “The Usual Suspects,” but three makes its inauguration a must. So today, we welcome The Maltese Falcon into the pantheon of The Usual Suspects!

The Filmography

The Maltese Falcon – 1941

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This is where it all began. The world’s greatest MacGuffin brings together a small crew of the world’s most nefarious deal makers and a little known detective named Sam Spade.

It’s the stuff that dreams are made of. It’s the object of desire that men and women will kill for. It’s the treasure worth chasing all over the world until there’s not a cent left in your pockets.

In my dreams, I like to imagine that Kasper “The Fatman” Gutman, Joel Cairo, and Brigid O’Shaughnessy are all still out there, desperately scheming for one last chance to get the bird… Not far behind is Sam Spade, smirking and shaking his head. Will they never learn?

You can read my original post on the film here.

All Through the Night – 1942

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I mean . . . that can’t really be what I think it is lurking in the shadows next to Peter Lorre, can it?

I don’t know what to think here. I’ve seen this movie so often and I’ve never noticed this shadow before. The film only came out about three months after The Maltese Falcon. Is that enough time to have slipped in a cameo? Next to Peter Lorre, the man who played Joel Cairo no less?!?

I’ve googled, read, searched, and even listened to the director’s commentary from Vincent Sherman and NO ONE MENTIONS IT!

What are the odds? I know, I know. You’re going to tell me that it’s more than likely a massive coincidence. But here’s the thing about coincidences, see? When the Falcon’s involved – there ain’t no coincidences. There’s only desperate people with desperate minds. . .

You can read my original post on the film here.

Conflict – 1945

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Yes, he seems to have grown an inch or two and lost a little bit of weight, but supposedly that’s The Maltese Falcon looming large behind Bogart in this murder mystery reunion with Sydney Greenstreet. He’s got his talons deep into them, ya see? He ain’t gonna let go for nothin’!

You can read my original post on the film here!

*The Usual Suspects is an ongoing feature on the blog where we discuss some of Bogart’s more frequent collaborators. When I post, you’ll take it, and you’ll like it! You can read the other entries here.*

The Treasure of the Sierra Madre – Ashley’s Take!

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*Bogie Film Blog: While I have my “Classic Bogie Moment” for each film, Ashley has her “Humphrey Bogart Eyes Moment.” I like it. I like it a lot. It’s one of those terms that once you hear it, you can never forget it. Now every time I watch a Bogie film, I’m picking out “eye” moments left and right. The man knew how to use the subtlest of facial expressions to hold the camera, and those eyes were powerful. So today, I drop you mid-post again, so make sure you click on over to Ashley’s blog to finish it, then check out her Twitter and Letterboxd profiles! The gal LOVES film, and she’s a great follow!*

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The Humphrey Bogart Eyes moment in The Treasure of the Sierra Madre came when Bogart’s Dobbs first sees the gold he and his team found. After struggling for so long, all Dobbs can think of is that he has asked a passersby for money for the last time. Dobbs is sure that he will never have to struggle again, as long as he can get home with his share. Almost simultaneously, Dobbs also becomes incredibly paranoid that his team is going to outwit him and crush the dreams he has for his fortune. The paranoia and euphoria captured on Dobbs’ face as the gold is weighed is the perfect Humphrey Bogart Eyes moment of The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, as only Bogie could capture it.

Head on over to Ashley’s blog to read the rest here!

*Ashley’s Take is part of the Take 2 series here on The Bogie Film Blog where we have guest writers give us there take on a classic Bogie film! You can read the rest of the entries here.*

Michael Curtiz

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Birth Name: Mihaly Kertesz

Birth: December 24, 1888

Death: April 10, 1962

Number of Films Michael Curtiz Made with Humphrey Bogart: 8

The Lowdown

Ask the casual Classic Film fan about John Huston or Howard Hawks and more than likely they’ll be some recognition. More than likely, Bogart’s name will come up. Huston and Hawks – those are household names if you’re in the Classic Film realm.

Now mention Michael Curtiz. There still might be some recognition from the casual fans. CasablancaWhite Christmas? Maybe if they’re a little more literate about the early years of Hollywood’s “Golden Age,” they might mention Yankee Doodle Dandy.

But the Hungarian born director is so prolific throughout Hollywood history that it’s hard to imagine his name is rarely spoken outside of intros on TCM.

Curtiz crossed the boundary between the silent films and talkies. At 38 years old and with 64 films already under his belt, Curtiz was finally lured over to the U.S. by Harry Warner in 1926 where he would work with some of Hollywood’s greatest actors – Grant, Cagney, Davis, Flynn, Crosby, Kaye, Crawford, Bergman, Lorre, Greenstreet, Huston, Muni, DeHavilland, Sheridan, O’Brien, The Dead End Kids, Bacall, Bogart, etc… many household names.

As far as Bogart was concerned though, Curtiz was always on the shortlist of directors that were pre-approved. Yes, they fought a lot on set – settling character arcs and plot developments with shouting matches while the cast and crew waited, but there was great respect there as well.

I feel like Bogart and Curtiz complimented one another, making up for what the other lacked. Curtiz hailed from the European school of film where complex camera moves with lots of dollies were the norm. Bogart was from the states where Film Noir taught directors and actors to keep it simple, get to the point, and let the actors do the heavy lifting. Perhaps more importantly, Curtiz cut his teeth in silent films, and few actors beyond Bogart knew how do so much with simple gestures and subtle facial expressions.

Bogart and Peter Lorre reportedly loved pranking Curtiz on both Casablanca and Passage to Marseille. My favorite stories are from Passage where the two actors would stall scenes with long and jokey anecdotes until Curtiz would finally laugh and then they could carry on.

For a man who was alongside of Bogart throughout his entire career – from the early B roles to the biggest film of Bogart’s life, to the lighter role of Joseph in We’re No Angels, it’s about doggone time that Curtiz was placed into The Usual Suspects!

(And I’d be remiss not to acknowledge that Curtiz also directed Doctor X! The sorta prequel to Bogart’s only venture into sci-fi/horror, The Return of Doctor X!)

The Filmography

Black Legion – 1937

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Curtiz is listed as an “uncredited” co-director here alongside of Archie Mayo, so I’m not exactly sure what his contributions to the film were. Considered by many to be one of Bogart’s biggest hidden gems, Black Legion is a must-see for anyone who likes Bogart’s better character work. Occasionally there will be a movie that is very well made, and yet so gut-wrenchingly powerful that I just can’t imagine sitting through it again. Schindler’s List was this way for me. So was Mystic River. I would easily add Black Legion to that category. Loosely based on a true story, Legion took me places emotionally that I wasn’t used to going in a Bogart film.

Bogart plays a blue collar machinist who’s frustrations and paranoia take him to an ugly, ugly place, and Directors Mayo and Curtiz do a great job of squeezing every drop of tension from this one.

You can read my original post on the film here.

Marked Woman – 1937

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This is another “uncredited” director role for Curtiz alongside of Lloyd Bacon. Bogart might get second billing on the poster, but in reality, he’s fourth or fifth down the line when it comes to screen time. Bette Davis is the real star here, and she does a good job in, but the script leans heavily on extravagant melodrama. The ripped-from-the-headlines tone of the film is almost too clichéd in this day and age to have the same impact that it did in the 30’s and 40’s. There is plenty to appreciate in this film though, as the cast has been put together well, and it’s always fun to see Bogart and Davis looking so young in their roles. Davis is as bright-eyed and gorgeous as she ever would be, and Bogart has got the healthiest, most filled out physique that I ever remember seeing on him.

You can read my original post on the film here.

Kid Galahad – 1937

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This was the first full collaboration between Director Curtiz and Bogart, and it was a bit of a tepid start in my opinion. It’s a by-the-numbers Warner picture for the time it was made. It’s not bad, but it’s not great. It’s predictable, but fun. Robinson and Davis definitely save the day with their great portrayals, turning it into an enjoyable film. Bogart’s relegated to being the stock gangster character.

What sets the film apart though, is Director Curtiz’s ability to direct the the boxing scenes with explosive action and a skill that was surely honed in his silent days.

You can read my original post on the film here.

Angels with Dirty Faces – 1938

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At one time, this Curtiz directed film was one of the biggest gaps in my Bogart/Classic Film knowledge. Does it live up to the hype? For the first hour – no. Not that I thought it was bad, because it’s actually very good. James Cagney and Pat O’Brien are great. Plus, there’s a good dose of Ann Sheridan, which is always a good thing!

I just didn’t think it was as good as everyone had told me. Up until the last fifteen minutes of the film I was ready to rank this one just below The Roaring Twenties. The script is good, but not great. Director Michael Curtiz does a fine job, but it’s a far cry from Casablanca. And then there’s the fact that Bogart is hardly in the film despite high billing and lots of presence in the advertising.

Then I got to the ending . . . wow.

Without giving anything away (in case you’re also behind on seeing this film), Cagney’s final scene is so powerful that I was still reeling from it two days after watching the film. The movie certainly didn’t have to end the way it does. It could have gone with a more audience-friendly finish. Yet Curtiz, Cagney, and O’Brien take what was a good film and elevate it to great with just the last fifteen minutes.

You can read my original post on the film here.

Virginia City – 1940

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Virginia City is a fun, old-school western with great performances by all the actors (save for a VERY poorly cast Bogart), and plenty of tension to keep you hooked until the end. With a running time of slightly over two hours, Director Michael Curtiz probably could have shaved off about twenty minutes with a few less horse chases and saloon scenes, but that’s a small complaint to have in an otherwise good film.

I thought Curtiz did a great job of making both sides of the conflict over the gold seem sympathetic. Heck, I was even rooting at points for Bogart’s painfully-accented Hispanic outlaw!

You can read my original post on the film here.

Casablanca – 1942

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The film that cemented Bogart’s legacy! If this had been his final film, I have no doubt that he’d still be the icon that he is today!

I think a majority of the credit has to go to Director Curtiz. From beginning to end, the city of Casablanca feels like a fully realized world. The daytime scenes are crammed from one edge of the screen to other with bustling streets. The nighttime scenes are packed with diversely populated clubs. The city is supposed to be overflowing with people looking to escape the war and Director Curtiz nailed it. This film is bursting at the seams with background artists, minor roles cast to perfection, supporting roles with some of Hollywood’s greatest character actors, and a handful of main characters that are handled deftly and given the time that they each need to establish their moments in the story.

Why do I need to defend what some argue as Hollywood’s greatest film?!? You can read my original post on the film here.

Passage to Marseille – 1944

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This one’s a real showcase for Director Curtiz. Marseille is a film that exists almost entirely in a flashback. But not just a flashback – as it’s a flashback within a flashback, which I think even delves into another flashback! Just the way the multiple flashbacks are handled without confusion shows a director who’s storytelling craft is top notch.

The entire movie is said to be a slightly missed attempt at recreating the magic that was Casablanca, as so many of the cast and crew return from that movie including director, writer, composer, producer, and at least five other actors. Perhaps I’m far enough removed from the era, but I thought that my love for Casablanca only enhanced my enjoyment of this film. The story is much more action oriented, and it comes off as more of a prison escape movie rather than a war romance.

You can read my original post on the film here.

We’re No Angels – 1955

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The last of eight films between Director Curtiz and Bogart, Angels is subtle, dry, a bit goofy, and a wonderful movie for these two collaborators to go out on. In a story of three escaped convicts, Curtiz uses Bogart, Peter Ustinov, and Aldo Ray to underplay the jokes so well that this film can often near the line of “dark comedy,” although I don’t think it ever steps over.

It’s silly, wonderful fun in the best possible sense. Plus! You get to see Bogart in an apron! Come on! That makes it a must see in itself!

You can read my original post on the film here.

‘The Usual Suspects’ is an ongoing feature on the blog that highlights some of Bogart’s best collaborators. You can find the ever-growing list of names here.