Lady Esther Presents – Casablanca – 1943

casa

My Review

—Another ½ Hour Surprise—

Honorary Bogie Fix:

5 radio

The Lowdown

It’s a classic radio adaption of Hollywood’s most classic film! You can read my original synopsis of the film here. Despite the drastically shortened run time, the film still retains almost all of its most important plot points, although Sydney Greenstreet’s role of Signor Ferrari has been completely excised and Peter Lorre’s Ugarte appears in name only.

What I Thought

With three of its top stars (Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, and Paul Henreid) back to reprise their roles from the film, a lot can be forgiven for what’s left out in this greatly shortened version of Hollywood’s greatest film. Would it have been nice to hear Dooley Wilson and Claude Rains reprise their roles? Sure, but the actors that they have filling in do close enough impressions that their essence is still there. Would it have been fun to hear Sydney Greenstreet and Peter Lorre back as well? Of course, but when you really consider how their roles were in the original film, it’s not surprising that they cut them for this brief adaption.

What makes this version work so well is that they followed the same formula used for the adaption of High Sierra – keep the love story, dump a lot of the atmosphere. We still get “As Time Goes By” and Paul Henreid once again lead’s the Café in a stirring rendition of “La Marseillaise” to shut those pesky Germans up, so I felt that this adaption has a slight edge over Lady Esther’s version of High Sierra since Sierra didn’t really have such iconic scenes to recreate.

What stuck out to me the most about this version though, was the fact that Rick Blaine really seems to be toying with Ilsa and Victor when it comes to the letters of transit. He says it’s purely business, but he refuses to give them to Victor despite the offer of a large monetary sum. He says he doesn’t want to give Captain Renault any reason to close down the nightclub, yet he doesn’t turn the papers over when given the chance. He tells Victor he’ll save Ilsa. He tells Ilsa that he’ll help her ditch Victor. He takes Renault to the airport with them instead of keeping him in the dark until Victor has escaped as if he wants the good Captain to know exactly how bad he’s been fooled. (Would anyone have questioned a forged signature on the papers?)

With just the audio to tell the story, is seemed much clearer to me that Rick was enjoying himself as he played games with all of the people involved – moving them around his own personal chess board – not sure of which way he wanted the game to play out. He had his own personal grudges and amusements to satisfy before even considering what might be the right thing to do. I would even say that there was a sense in this broadcast that he might not make the “right” choice in the end despite the fact that I knew what was going to happen.

Bogart and Bergman

How come these two didn’t make more films together?!? I hate to say it, but Bergman really steals the show here – recapturing her performance straight from the film. Their scene together as they remember their time in France is especially well done.

Again, Bogart delivers on his lines just as if you’re hearing audio from the movie. It wasn’t until hearing this version though, that I realized how much of his performance from the film is visual. The white tux. The smoking. The drunken sorrow at the table after hours. The contemplative chess. The thousand-yard stare as he holds a gun at the end. Much of his humor has been removed as well, so the character’s not nearly as mischievous as he was on the big screen. Still, I have a feeling that no one will be disappointed with his performance here.

The Rest of the Cast

No names for the supporting actors were given, but the actors playing Sam and Captain Renault do a great job of making us think Dooley Wilson and Claude Rains are back!

The Bottom Line

This one will make you want to watch the film again ASAP.

Advertisements

One thought on “Lady Esther Presents – Casablanca – 1943

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s